W005
Indigenous rights in a global context

Convenors:
Charles Menzies (University of British Columbia)
Irène Bellier (CNRS)
Format:
Workshops
Location:
Theatre S3
Start time:
12 July, 2012 at 11:30
Session slots:
3

Short abstract:

The UN Declaration of the Rights of Indigenous Peoples recognizes their rights in the international context. Our papers draw from ongoing research with Indigenous communities to explore how indigenous rights are enacted in the local and how they are presented and enacted in global contexts.

Long abstract:

The UN Declaration of the Rights of Indigenous Peoples recognizes the rights of indigenous peoples while not actually providing a consistent mechanism to implement these rights in specific national contexts. At the national levels, governments have variously implemented laws and regulations governing aboriginal peoples. However, there is wide variation from State to State in regards the extent of regulation and the legal definition of who constitutes an indigenous person, an indigenous nation, an indigenous people. Our participants draw from ongoing ethnographic research with Indigenous communities to explore how indigenous authority and jurisdiction is enacted at the local, and regional levels and how it is presented and enacted in global contexts. Our papers take a global, multi-scale, comparative perspective to document and discuss the social, cultural and political issues relating to governance and the rights of Indigenous Peoples. Ultimately, we are concerned with investigating the ways in which the principles of the UN Declaration are put into practice in specific national contexts.