P08
Rivers and shores: 'fluviality' and the occupation of colonial Amazonia

Convenors:
Rafael Chambouleyron (Universidade Federal do Pará)
Location:
Bloco 1, Sala 1.12
Start time:
13 July, 2017 at 14:00
Session slots:
2

Short abstract:

Throughout the 17th and 18th century, the settlement of the Amazon region by the Portuguese led to a society characterized both by its connections to other Portuguese territories, mainly through the Atlantic Ocean, and by the central role played by rivers in the occupation of this vast territory.

Long abstract:

Throughout the 17th and 18th century, the settlement of the Amazon region by the Portuguese led to a society characterized both by its connections to other Portuguese territories, mainly through the Atlantic Ocean, and by the central role played by rivers in the occupation of this vast territory. Rivers were the means of communication along which peoples of different origins were connected, whether they were Indians, Creoles, Africans, Mestizos, and Europeans (since the Amazon region was vast frontier). At the same time in the colonial Amazon region, rivers became a creative and fertile space for the development of agriculture, of cultures, societies and social practices. Our aim is to discuss the specificities of colonial Amazonia where rivers and oceans took part in the shaping of colonial society and economy. Thus, we seek to understand the colonial Amazonia as society defined by its links to the Atlantic and the backlands and their many rivers. In fact, in the Amazon region, Portuguese colonization followed the course of rivers, such as many Indian peoples had been doing for centuries. This panel will discuss Amazonian rivers and their use by a variety of social groups in different times, such as the influence of native dynamics in the settlement of the region, the role of rivers for the evangelization of Indian peoples, for the organization of colonial economy, and their influence in social practices in the Amazon region.