Gend03
Men's commitment in long term care: changes in kinship and gender?

Convenors:
Antónia Pedroso de Lima (ISCTE-IUL / CRIA )
Natalia Alonso Rey (Universitat Rovira i Virgili (Tarragona))
Stream:
Gender
Location:
Aula 18
Start time:
15 April, 2019 at 9:00
Session slots:
2

Short abstract:

Daily care needs are increasing in aging European societies. In this panel we invite participants to analyse, through ethnographic data, men's involvement in long term care to understand how kinship and gender are performed and to discuss possible transformations.

Long abstract:

Daily care needs are increasing in aging European societies. In this panel we invite participants to analyse men's involvement in long term care to understand how kinship and gender are performed. Gender and care have long been analysed together. The role of women as caregivers - a role that has been naturalised and contested as part of their gender performance - has long been analysed. The role of men as carers has been gaining interest in the last years, especially in connection to fatherhood. The intersection of care and kinship has also been subject to study, although to a lesser extent. Sahlins (2013) describes the reciprocity circuit of care among relatives as "mutuality of being", which generates obligations that are unequally distributed among family members. Kinship is a gendered category, with different -and unequal - attributed duties and expectations. Moreover, gender performance must also be interrogated together with kinship roles that vary along the life course and have transformed due to changes in intergenerational relationships and family models. We invite contributors to explore, through ethnographic data, how gender and kinship are performed through the lens of men's implication in care to discuss possible changes in gender/kinship system and performance. Some of the proposed topics are: - Kinship and men as caregivers in formal and informal settings - Changes in intergenerational relationships and care - Men as caregivers of dependant adults: husbands, sons, brothers, fathers - Long-term care and new masculinities - Men's narratives of care