P055
The Anthropology of Drawing
Convenor:
Frances Robertson (Glasgow School of Art)
Format:
Panels
Location:
SOAS Main Building - G51a
Start time:
1 June, 2018 at 11:30
Session slots:
3

Short abstract:

This panel considers how groups acquire and invent in a self-reflexive manner specific drawing styles and strategies as a means of learning, teaching, inhabiting and articulating particular genres of visualisation with a focus that overlaps design thinking, STS approaches and cultural anthropology.

Long abstract:

This panel considers how groups acquire and invent in a self-reflexive manner specific drawing styles and strategies as a means of learning, teaching, inhabiting and articulating particular genres of visualisation. With a focus that overlaps 'design thinking' and STS approaches, speakers examine children's drawings, design methods and other contemporary working practices. The introductory session drawings as the expression of closed and somewhat abstract dialogues—in relation to facilitating children's examination of social conventions; in elucidating the multiple shifting viewpoints of landscape architects; or in asking how much outsiders can understand financial experts via trading screens. The second session considers performative enactments of drawing genres by participants, with large gestures and comic book styles—in relation to choosing the correct tone, whether serious or comical, for public health messages; to challenging interpretations of children's drawings and their application to current STEM teaching in schools; and to the development of a critical methodology of visual research into Indonesian wayang puppet theatre. The final session examines the active drawing practices of educators, and their relationships to past and future distinct genres—in relation to the relationships between ergonomic thinking in product design in the 1940s that developed alongside life room conceptions of the human body; in the 'walk about' sketches of a Jamaican art educator; and finally in live demonstration of the performative architectural lecturing practice of John Soane through time in the early nineteenth century.