Accepted Paper:

Drawing and attentive perception  

Author:

John Temperton (York St John University)

Paper short abstract:

This proposal considers a series of three drawings by the contributor which investigate alternative interpretations of a pre-existing concept created by a child. The variants will consist of the original drawing and three alternate figuration's which challenge perception, intention, and usefulness.

Paper long abstract:

The author intends to demonstrate the behavioural link which exists between curiosity, local processing, visuo-spatial drawing ability and functional changes which might occur as a consequence of intensive drawing practice in the individual. Drawing skill varies enormously in the population and access to creative subjects in education particularly since the introduction of the new baccalaureate continues to challenge the creative sector. How we value drawing as a process matters in respect of culture, economic potential and use. Many children have a burning need to draw the world around them. While making a mark remains essential in public language drawing skill at a certain age becomes less useful except to those associated to have natural talent alone outside of the rigour of core subjects. Drawing could be considered a physical activity promoted by the way in which our minds reach out to the external domain in order to intellectually disseminate, interpret and express, all advanced critical academic activities stimulated by our common ability to visually interpret the world. There has been some academic debate which suggests drawing accuracy is not a result of better perception, veridical or motor coordination but an ability to construct in the mind a robust internal representation of object structure in visual memory by discriminating between the relative spatial position of object segments, in both broad and fine detail. Is it possible then that drawing can be used across the modern curriculum as a critical form of inquiry in support of STEM?

Panel P055
The Anthropology of Drawing