P042


The praxis of collaborative ethnography: knowledge production with social movements
Convenors:
Aurora Alvarez Veinguer (University of Granada )
Gunther Dietz (Universidad Veracruzana)
Alberto Arribas (University of the Witwatersrand)
Format:
Panels
Location:
U6-38
Start time:
22 July, 2016 at 9:00 (UTC+0)
Session slots:
2

Short abstract:

This panel will discuss and analyse the complexities, outcomes, challenges and hopes of collaborative research. We will move away from normative and/or celebratory accounts of collaboration, trying to thicken the ongoing debates by critically exploring actual forms of collaborative engagement.

Long abstract:

Collaboration has become central to the re-imagination and redefinition

of our practices. On wide terms, the notion of collaborative research

refers to a particular type of fieldwork encounter based on designing,

implementing and sustaining joint projects with our research subjects.

Within that framework, collaborative engagement with social movements

allows us to advance the analysis of contemporary collective action; it

is relevant for the activists by integrating their own insights,

interests and questions into the research; and addresses salient debates

in Anthropology, problematizing traditional forms of knowledge

production and validation, and locating epistemic and methodological

questions at the centre of our projects. However, while recognizing its

potentialities, it should not be glossed over that collaboration is

always tensed by a multiplicity of heterogeneous demands that come from

both the academic field and the research subjects, and that have to be

continuously addressed and renegotiated. In this sense, and in order to

deepen our understanding of the praxis and politics of collaborative

ethnography, it is necessary to move away from normative and/or

celebratory accounts of collaboration, and to thicken the ongoing

debates by critically exploring actual forms of collaborative engagement.

In that sense, this panel is aimed at discussing collaborative research

experiences and projects developed along with social movement

organizations worldwide, analysing its complexities and outcomes, its

challenges and hopes. Given our own locations in South Africa, Mexico

and Spain, we are particularly interested in considering proposals

coming from the Global South, understanding the Global South as epistemic locations.