Env06
Geometry and anthropology: description, projection, and measurement
Convenor:
Raymond Lucas (University of Manchester)
Discussant:
Tim Ingold
Stream:
Environment
Format:
Location:
Queen Elizabeth House (QEH) SR1
Start time:
21 September, 2018 at 9:00
Session slots:
2

Short abstract:

The aim is to consider human aspects of geometry: how geometric understanding is mobilised in the world; the implications of alternatives; and what geometry allows us to do. Papers are invited which discuss geometry as a skilled way of knowing our bodies, our hands, and our place in the world.

Long abstract:

This panel builds upon cross-disciplinary workshops held at the Universities of Manchester (architecture) and Aberdeen (anthropology) on anthropology and geometry. The aim is to consider human aspects of geometry: how geometric understanding is mobilised in the world; the implications of alternatives; and what geometry allows us to do. Each mode of design and making uses geometry: a spatial and formal knowledge of the world. Imagination and creativity are essential to understanding practices of making, of design. Geometry is one aspect of this, a means by which the life-world is both described and controlled. Understanding of geometries is essential our knowledge of and through design and craft practice. Geometries are multiple, and specific to the needs and environment of each profession, be they weavers, painters, surveyors, architects or engineers. Discussion of geometry often implies singular and universal understandings, but nothing could be further from the truth. panel will investigate the presence and role of geometries in a range of practices where geometry can be understood as both a skill and a tool. Papers are invited which discuss geometry as a skill and practice, as a way of knowing materials and the world. Geometry is not static: it is mobilised by the movements of our bodies, our hands, and our place in the world. Potential themes include, but are not limited to: Material Knowledge; Sense-Making through Geometry; Processes of Abstraction; Movement, Breath and the Human Body; Recording and Representing, Projection and Inscription; Imagination and Emergence; 'Universal' Geometries; Geometry as Earth-Measurement.