Reli03
Religious in idiosyncrasy. New religious movements in the 21st century [SIEF Ethnology of Religion Working Group]

Convenors:
Peter Jan Margry (University of Amsterdam/Meertens Institute, Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences)
István Povedák (Hungarian Academy of Sciences / University of Szeged)
Stream:
Religion and Rituals
Format:
Roundtables Workshops
Location:
Aula 24
Start time:
17 April, 2019 at 9:00
Session slots:
2

Short abstract:

This panel addresses the issue of new (implicit) expressions of religiosity (c.q. spirituality) and of new religious movements that came into being during the past years.

Long abstract:

This panel addresses the issue of new expressions of religiosity (c.q. spirituality) and of new religious movements which came into being during the past decades. Due to modern (social) media it became in recent years easier to disseminate and establish new or alternative religious views and movements. The topic relates to an increasing idiosyncratic or subjectivated behaviour of people to change track and to find religious meaning or comfort outside the institutional/traditional religions. Sometimes explicit as in obvious cults and sects, however many expressions are constituted in an implicit way and are seemingly of a secular nature. For example, in Santiago de Compostela a 'Camino of the atheists' came into being by people who did not want to relate their walking to the Church and preferred to walk the 'Celtic' path towards the Finisterre cape, last year Avatar, the human potential movement, was again frontpage news as a sectarian 'threat', and celebrity adoration may also gain religious characteristics, albeit it remains unclear if musician Prince († 2016) gained a religious following or not. Papers are preferred that bring up new religious expressions - whether small-local or big-global - and discuss their nature, the ways on how they are created and how they were able to establish and keep following (motifs); further, papers evaluate the aspect of religiosity, especially for implicit expressions found somewhere betwixt and between the secular and sacred; also relevant is the movement's position in society and possible confrontations with authorities (civil or clerical) and others.