Accepted Paper:

Immersive environments; How artistic process unfolds from the mind of an artist in the studio, to the arena and back again.  

Author:

Isla Griffin (Massey University, New Zealand.)

Paper short abstract:

This paper explores the feedback loops that occur within an artists process and intent for the work produced, regardless of medium or underlying concepts, when faced with providing meaningful encounters for strangers. Immersive events, engaging the entire sensorium, may offer solace to all.

Paper long abstract:

How can immersivity within the context of an event, capture both artist and participant in a mutually rewarding outcome? In the beginning is a grand idea, one where an artist may want to go beyond the personal gratification of making, to create work that sets in motion a shift in the viewer, maybe a change in the world. This could be an original intent for the particular work or it could emerge as the idea develops momentum. Often the grand idea is beyond the skill set of the artist so collaborations and technical support are sought that shift again the parameters of the idea, expanding it, altering its threads. Immersive environments, those deliberately constructed to engage more than just sight in experiencing an artwork, are designed from the outset to capture an audience for long enough to provoke them into deeper levels of transformation. In the context of my own experience in transitioning from a painter/sculptor to an artist using digital platforms and audio-visual projection I am interested in how by creating immersive environments, rolling out a grand idea, collaborating, being flexible but staying true to the original intent for the work the feedback mechanism is as much self appreciating as it is audience response. The impact of an immersive event has fed into the collective synapses and that experience in itself maybe all that is needed to spark up an expanded awareness beyond the daily input flow of life's encounters.

Panel P054
Ephemeral, transformational and collaborative: Ethnographies of art events