P06


Politics in the margins: the everyday state, violence and contested rule in South Asia 
Convenors:
Nel Vandekerckhove (University of Amsterdam)
Bart Klem (University of Melbourne)
Location:
C301
Start time:
27 July, 2012 at 9:00 (UTC+0)
Session slots:
2

Short Abstract:

This panel brings together ethnographic research on contested rule and armed movements in South Asia. Rather than the breakdown of order or state decay, we posit that these conflicts propel alternative forms of authority, which compete and converge with the tentacles of formal state rule.

Long Abstract

This panel brings together a set of ethnographic case studies on contested rule in South Asia. In line with the contemporary literature on this topic, the contributors choose to move away from monolithic notions of a coherent "up-there" state that hangs above the fray of society, and instead focus on the emergence of different forms of rule in South Asia's contested environments. The case studies from Nepal, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh and India converge around the idea that Maoist uprisings, armed separatism and vigilantes do not result in the breakdown of order and state decay. Rather, they tend to propel alternative forms of rule and authority beyond the state, which compete and converge with the tentacles of formal state rule.

Accepted papers: