P194
Soft constraint and the reshaping of the urban political space: relocated urban dwellers in African cities' peripheries

Convenors:
Marie Bridonneau (Université Paris Nanterre)
Amandine Spire (UMR CESSMA University Paris Diderot)
Stream:
Panels
Location:
RH0S1
Start time:
30 June, 2017 at 9:00
Session slots:
1

Short abstract:

This panel focuses on the analysis of forced relocation regarding their links with the making of the urban political space. We would like to raise these issues by paying attention to the reinvention of daily practices by relocated urban dwellers to underline the evolution of preexisting orders.

Long abstract:

This panel focuses on the analysis of relocation (following forced displacements) regarding their links with the making of the urban political space. The practice of urban displacements in African cities is not a new phenomenon. However, the current relocation processes reflect some original patterns for examining the way of negotiating a renewed 'soft constraint' (supposed to be part of a new socio-spatial order) in the frame of urban modernization policies. We offer to gather diverse analyses of these urban policies focusing after the displacement in order to explore peripheral resettlement sites produced by the articulation of different stakeholders involved in urban government. We consider the relocation as a particular situation testing urban norms, generating certain adjustments of practices and conducts between urban authorities and city dwellers. These mutual adjustments lead to the emergence of new socio-spatial layouts redefining the edges of the right to the city. We suggest considering the right to the city as the result of the broad processes of the stabilization of urban norms. It renews the debate: what becomes stabilised and standardised in the period following displacement and what is contested? How do these peripheral relocation sites turn into the confrontation of displaced city dwellers' experiences with dispossessed rural dwellers' ones? How are the categories of rights to remain (or not) in the city created? We would like to raise these issues by paying attention to the reinvention of daily practices by relocated urban dwellers in order to underline the evolution of preexisting orders.