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P241


Hydrogen pasts and futures 
Convenors:
Kornelia Konrad (University of Twente)
Filip Rozborski (Graz University of Technology)
Andreas Weber (University of Twente)
Senna Middelveld
Michael Kriechbaum (Graz University of Technology)
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Format:
Traditional Open Panel

Short Abstract:

We invite contributions that investigate present and past hydrogen futures, their context of emergence, and their performativity, just as papers that tackle hydrogen projects, policies, or look at green hydrogen production from a long-term historical, political ecological or justice lens.

Long Abstract:

The Paris Agreement to mitigate climate change requires hard-to-abate industries to transform their production practices. Hydrogen, an element that has already sparked energy visions and hype in the past, has thus seen a renaissance in recent years, in particular as large-scale, renewables-based ‘green hydrogen’. Not the least, it is often propagated as a means to mitigate emissions of the Global North, based on new production and transport systems in the Global South, as large-scale green hydrogen production requires enormous amounts of renewable energy. Whether such visions and projects, which are likely to be shaped by the specific historical context of a region, constitute opportunities for improving livelihoods in the Global South or a new form of colonialism remains a matter of debate. Furthermore, while hydrogen visions and projects are widely discussed in policy and industry circles, citizen perspectives and voices, either from the North or South, are hardly visible in the debate.

For this panel, we invite contributions that investigate present and past hydrogen futures, their context of emergence, and their performativity . We also welcome contributors that tackle specific hydrogen related projects, policies, and research and innovation activities. The panel also fosters the exploration of how a transition to green hydrogen may impact various regions and sectors. We are looking for contributions from a broad range of STS approaches, such as the fields of responsible research and innovation, socio-technical imaginaries and expectations, governance perspectives or the field of sustainability transitions. This also includes papers that look at green hydrogen production from a long-term historical, political ecological or justice lens. We particularly invite authors from Global South countries to contribute to our panel.

Accepted papers: