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P200


Climate actions, algorithms and digital infrastructures 
Convenors:
Sung-Yueh Perng (National Yang Ming Chiao Tung University)
Sophia Maalsen (University of Sydney)
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Format:
Combined Format Open Panel

Short Abstract:

Climate actions are urgent and enrol wide ranging algorithms, data and digital infrastructure. The combined panel invites contributions to explore, critically reflect, devise interventions or propose alternative approaches to knowing and making just algorithmic climate actions.

Long Abstract:

Actions targeting net-zero transitions are urgent and enrol wide ranging algorithms, data and digital infrastructure to accelerate their pace. From climate scenario modelling and carbon sink identification to the optimisation of electricity grids and factories, algorithms can be found recognising, categorising, calculating or regularising data about diverse social, geological, chemical, biological and environmental processes that are key to ushering net-zero transitions. In plans and policies adopted by local and national governments, enhancing algorithmic capabilities as a key measure to achieve net-zero transition goals in domains such as energy, home, transportation, finance and carbon capture and reuse, is high on their agenda.

However, it is equally important to examine the multiplication of algorithmic climate actions and the diverse practices, logics, imaginaries, materialities and politics such actions produce. Algorithms contribute differently to climate knowledge and decarbonisation technologies. They are entangled in different practices, imaginaries and infrastructures when pursuing carbon reduction goals. They can be significantly shaped by techno-solutionist strategies, ignoring that algorithms can be harmful, have unintended consequences and maintain and amplify structural inequalities. Additionally, just decarbonisation is crucial, but justice is differently perceived, articulated and enacted in different environmental, technological and social conditions.

In light of these issues, this combined panel invites contributions to explore, critically reflect, devise interventions or proposing alternative approaches to knowing and making just algorithmic climate actions. The panel will combine academic presentations and a dialogue session. Contributions are invited to address topics including but not limited to:

Data and ways of feeding climate algorithms

Algorithms and digital infrastructures for climate actions

Contested climate algorithmic operations and infrastructures

Potentials for algorithmic climate harm and care

Just decarbonised futures with algorithms

Knowledges in understanding algorithmic decarbonisations

Marginalised perspectives, practices and experiences of algorithmic climate actions

Accepted contributions: