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P059


Anticipatory transformations, disruptions and variations 'in' and 'for' Open Science 
Convenors:
Hannot Rodríguez (University of the Basque Country UPV-EHU)
Sergio Urueña (University of Twente and University of the Basque Country UPV-EHU)
Andoni Ibarra (University of the Basque Country)
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Format:
Traditional Open Panel

Short Abstract:

This panel aims to elucidate the anticipatory and/or disruptive scope of transformative Open Science policies and practices, and to explore alternative ways of conceiving and applying the ideal of 'openness' in relation to the dynamics of science, technology and innovation.

Long Abstract:

The ways in which science and technology are conceived and practiced have undergone various transformations in recent decades. In the context of European research policy, institutional initiatives such as RRI (Responsible Research and Innovation) have characterised responsible research and innovation in eminently political or inclusive terms–at least in some of its more radical meanings. The governance of research and innovation would thus be based on a collective dynamic of negotiation aimed at enabling a more robust alignment of science and technology with a diversity of societal expectations, values and interests. In this context, anticipation, understood as a socio-epistemic tool at the service of opening up and transforming the socio-technical futures towards which science and technology are oriented and on which they are constituted in the present, became a key resource.

However, RRI and similar normative frameworks and principles have been subject to strong constraints that have resulted in the instrumentalisation (or limitation) of their disruptive or transformative capacity (minimised in the name of a set of prefixed socio-economic preferences and imperatives). Moreover, more recent policy developments seem to have sidelined these more radically transformative anticipatory conceptions in favour of proposals and practices whose disruptive ambition and anticipatory scope are even more dubious and less evident. A case in point is the recent institutional commitment to Open Science.

The aim of the panel is to elucidate the anticipatory and/or disruptive scope of transformative Open Science policies and practices, and to explore alternative ways of conceiving and applying the ideal of 'openness' in relation to the dynamics of science, technology and innovation. In this regard, this panel particularly welcomes (without exhaustion) contributions that aim to analyse the role that anticipation plays and/or could play in opening up the rationale of Open Science.

Accepted papers: