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P057


How, when and why does science (fail to) correct itself? 
Convenors:
Mady Malheiro Barbeitas (CNRS)
Candida Sánchez Burmester (Maastricht University)
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Format:
Combined Format Open Panel

Short Abstract:

This open panel aims to address a) how hype and other factors encourage scientists to make erroneous or even fraudulent claims and discourage error correction; and, conversely, b) how, when, and why scientists do attempt to correct errors.

Long Abstract:

A common assumption is that ‘the truth will out’ in science. Even if researchers make mistakes, it is assumed that errors will be eventually corrected. However, scientists, who flag exaggerated claims and errors in the scientific record and try to correct them, often face challenges. They encounter delays in publishing responses, dismissive behavior, and lack of institutional support. We would like to convene at least three sessions and a round table/workshop in order to better understand a) how hype and other factors encourage scientists to make erroneous or even fraudulent claims and discourage error correction; and, conversely, b) how, when, and why scientists do attempt to correct errors. 1) The first session will focus on field transformations through hype and ignorance. We invite paper presentations that discuss, for example, the formation and bursting of bubbles, hype around emerging technologies and converging fields, and the creation of sites of ignorance. 2) The second session will address metric regimes and epistemic activism. We welcome paper presentations that investigate evaluation metrics and the influence of science-based movements in research integrity 3) In the third session we would like to situate replications in the 21st century. While building on classic debates in STS, we aim to open a discussion that links replications to recent transformations. Contributions could, for example, address replication practices in contemporary transdisciplines, the (mis)use of problems with reproducibility in (climate) denialism, insights into institutionalized replication projects, and ways of historicizing the ‘reproducibility crisis’. 4) For the fourth session we would like to organize a round table/workshop that is centered around the question what the obstacles have been for (self-)correction in academia and industry. For all sessions, we especially welcome papers with a focus on the Global South or other regions that have received less attention in discussions on science correction.

Accepted contributions: