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P006
Africa and the Changing World of the Twenty-First Century: Research Horizons Beyond the Europe-Africa Relationship [Africanist Network]
Convenors:
David O'Kane (Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology)
Dmitri Bondarenko (Institute for African Studies)
Format:
Network affiliated Panels
Time zone:
UTC+1
Sessions:
Thursday 23 July, 8:30-10:15, 11:00-12:45

Short abstract:

What will the logics of the twenty-first century mean for a continent that remains the most marginalised and exploited in the world? We invite papers on any topic and any region of Africa that deal with the relationships between Africa and the rapidly changing twenty-first century world.

Long abstract:

The multi-polar twenty-first century is clearly driven by its own emerging logics, geopolitical, economic and environmental, and this has particular implications for Africa. The continent still struggles for economic development and remains politically weak: yet the social and political turbulence observable across the African space is a sign of a continent in movement and change, one that is both affected by the emerging logics of our time, and adding its share to those logics. What will this mean for Africa? To help address this question, we are looking for papers that deal explicitly with African relationships, plural, with a world that is changing rapidly. These may be intra-African relations, or relationships with external powers old or new. We also welcome work engaging with the world environmental crisis, in any of the forms which that crisis takes. That crisis will shape all our futures: how will it shape Africa's? How will Africa's new relationships, within, between and beyond the continent shape its present and its multiple futures? What effects might renegotiations of old relationships have on Africa's present and future conditions? We welcome papers dealing with any region or research topic. In particular, we are eager to receive work from African researchers working in the continent today. The task of Africanist research today must be to move, decisively, beyond Europe, both in terms of research personnel, research questions and even - possibly - research paradigms.