P127
Vulnerability and housing policies: anthropological insights across Europe

Convenors:
Ana Luísa Micaelo (University Institute of Lisbon (ISCTE-IUL))
Rita Cachado (ISCTE-University Institute of Lisbon)
Giacomo Pozzi (Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca)
Stream:
Panels
Location:
Aula Magna-Spelbomskan
Start time:
17 August, 2018 at 9:00
Session slots:
2

Short abstract:

We are looking for anthropological insights concerning housing vulnerability - centred on histories of eviction, displacement and resistance - in different European countries, with focus on the analytical debate about the capacity of housing policies to promote stability, mobility or settlement.

Long abstract:

On one hand, as a symbolic, social and spatial phenomenon, housing vulnerability and eviction are particular forms of forced mobility loaded with great anthropological significance. On the other hand, different housing policies, implemented in tension between rights and contention, markets and families (houses as assets/homes), hold a privileged task in governing the population, by determining both mobility and settling processes. In this sense, housing represents a material, political and symbolic crux in social and economic mobility, establishing the political boundaries of those who are seen as eligible buyers, (il)legitimate dwellers, natives or newcomers. Therefore, defining those who should "stay" and those who should "move". In this panel we are looking for anthropological insights concerning housing vulnerability - centred on histories of eviction, displacement and resistance - in different European countries, with focus on the analytical debate about the capacity of housing policies to promote stability, mobility or settlement. We are interested in addressing the different temporalities of such policies, whether in the short time of personal and family experiences or at the long-term of generations, neighbourhoods and cities, and other ties of social and local belonging. The focus is on the variety of European practices, yet other empirical and comparative data addressing these topics will be welcome.