Accepted paper:

Notes and Notices of Eviction. The social value of sfratto in the Italian context

Authors:

Giacomo Pozzi (Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca)

Paper short abstract:

In this paper I intend to analyze the Italian context - through the case study of the city of Milan - as a privileged site to understand the social value of "housing career" to improve or obstruct local mobility.

Paper long abstract:

The recent economic crisis has not only caused the real estate market collapse, it has also made it more difficult for tenants to bear the economic burden of paying rent [Tosi 2017]. Recent data presented by the Ministry of the Interior confirm that in Milan in 2015 there were 32,249 requests for eviction (sfratto) [Ministry of Interiors 2016]. At the same time, data from the Municipality of Milan show that an increasing number of citizens are applying for the assignment of a social housing. Nowadays more than 25,000 families are registered on the waiting lists [√Čupolis Lombardia 2015]. In this context, an ethnographic perspective is a vehicle for conveying the socio-political value of home and "home loss" in the everyday life [Desmond 2016] as much as for understanding the relationship of power between the State (and its agents) and citizens [Fassin 2015]. According to this perspective, as Carsten stated, homes "embody the interconnections between individual trajectories, kinship and the state" [Carsten 2018: 103]. In this paper I intend to analyze the Italian context - through the case study of the city of Milan - as a privileged site to understand the social value of "housing career" to improve or obstruct local mobility. In this configuration evictions play a symbolic and material role. Evictions represent fundamental rites of institution [Bourdieu 1993] that structure the social possibility of individual or familiar stability, mobility or settlement. As rites, evictions contribute to the formulation of politics and practices of inclusion and exclusion.

panel P127
Vulnerability and housing policies: anthropological insights across Europe