E01
Everyday practices of inequality (Paper)

Convenors:
Uma Kothari (University of Manchester)
Alex Arnall (University of Reading)
Stream:
E: Everyday inequalities
Location:
D2
Start time:
27 June, 2018 at 14:00
Session slots:
1

Short abstract:

This panel explores how global inequalities are created, reproduced and potentially transformed at the level of day-to-day, routine life. It considers how studying people's everyday social relations, experiences and practices can provide new insights into addressing inequality at different scales.

Long abstract:

There has been considerable interest amongst researchers in how inequality is structured at international, national and local levels, and the effects that it has from the perspectives of those individual and groups experiencing it. While recognising the considerable challenges that inequality brings to different societies around the world, much of this work has sought to understand this problem from conventional socioeconomic or political perspectives. This panel takes a new approach to inequality by exploring how it is created, reproduced and potentially transformed at the level of day-to-day life. The everyday is the realm of common sense, un-reflexive habit and mundane oppression but also of imagination and adaptation. The panel will look at how, far from being 'ordinary' or 'mundane' and therefore of little consequence to research and policymaking, understanding how inequality unfolds and is incorporated into and made meaningful in the contexts of people's everyday social relations, experiences and practices can provide new and potentially transformative insights into addressing the problem. The panel organisers welcome proposals from different disciplines that make a variety of theoretical and/or empirical contributions to this theme. What forms of everyday practices of inequality are there? How are they constituted and performed, and with what effects? How are they reproduced and potentially altered? Potential topics include: • Everyday inequality, environmental change and political ecology; • The dynamics of daily social practice; • Theories of resistance and the everyday; • Making life 'livable' on a day-to-day basis; • Routineness, habituation and temporality; • Methodological considerations and issues.