Accepted paper:

Cities of the Global South: Making Life "Liveable" on a Day-to-Day Basis

Author:

Zubeida Lowton (University of Westminster)

Paper short abstract:

This research seeks to address the legacy of social and spatial fragmentation in cities in the Global South, particularly Johannesburg. The continued reproduction of inequality will be assessed by investigating influences of social segregation and spatial fragmentation experienced on a daily basis.

Paper long abstract:

This research seeks to address the legacy of social and spatial fragmentation in cities in the Global South. In order to do this, the research explores the relationship between urban form and spatial transformation in influencing the everyday social relations and experiences of local communities. South Africa is located in sub-Saharan Africa and is considered to be the most urbanised and developed countries in Africa. Like many Global South cities, the history of inequality in Johannesburg can be traced back to periods of segregation, namely: colonialism and apartheid. The continued reproduction of inequality through social segregation and spatial fragmentation has influenced the liveability of the city at present. Donaldson (2001), confirms that there have been attempts to recreate the place and space of South African city identities. One of the most visible attempts is the Johannesburg Council's vision to develop the city into a "World Class African City" that is both sustainable and liveable. This is fitting as Johannesburg is considered a city of migrants, therefore making life in the city liveable on a day-to-day basis is key to addressing inequality. The potential to transform inequality will be assessed using social sustainability and liveability initiatives. The investigation of the historical grounding of day-to-day liveability problems, will assist in determining the relationship between social segregation and spatial fragmentation. Africa is an ever-evolving continent that poses so much untapped potential that is often overlooked due to the history of spatial and social change.

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