P56
The political economy of social protection: political institutions, elites and social classes

Convenors:
Miguel Niño-Zarazúa (UNU-WIDER)
Location:
Room 15 (Examination Schools)
Start time:
12 September, 2016 at 14:00
Session slots:
2

Short abstract:

In recent years, social protection emerged as a key policy strategy against poverty and vulnerability in the developing world. Financing remains a key constraint, although their feasibility often depends on political economy considerations. What political economy factors explain such developments?

Long abstract:

In recent years, social protection emerged as a key policy strategy against poverty and vulnerability in the developing world. Financing remains a key constraint in that process, although the feasibility of revenue mobilisation strategies often depends on political economy considerations. What political economy factors explain this development? Recent work has underlined important knowledge gaps in theoretical and conceptual wok, and also in comparative analysis of political institutions, norms, and financial considerations that facilitate (or limit) the evolution and sustainability of these systems. This panel aims to address the following questions: What political regimes or conditions have facilitated (or limited) the expansion of social protection in developing countries? How domestic and external actors could promote these conditions? What underlines their political legitimacy? What are the (dis)incentives of incumbent governments to use natural resource rents, redistribution, or other forms of revenue mobilization to finance social protection? What are the short-term and long-term implications of such decisions? Comparative analysis, as well as theoretical models and conceptual analysis are essential, and therefore, welcome to address these questions