RM-KG08
Status of women in South Asia: changes and challenges
Convenors:
K. M. Mohsin (Dhaka International University)
Md Abdullah Al Masum (University of Chittagong)
Saiful Islam Chowdhury (University of Chittagong)
Stream:
Relational movements: Kin and Gender/Mouvements relationnels: Parenté et genre
Location:
TBT 309
Start time:
4 May, 2017 at 16:00
Session slots:
1

Short abstract:

This panel will explore the factors that help to change the status of women in South Asia during the last few decades. This panel will also address the impediments and challenges that constrain women from their legitimate clams to enjoy the benefits from development works of the state.

Long abstract:

South Asia is a densely populated, agriculture dependent region comprising seven different sovereign nations. This is an area of the world containing remarkable ethnic, linguistic, religious, geographical, and political diversity. Despite the diversities stemming from class, culture, religion and the areas they live in, there are similarities in the challenges encountered by women. However, women’s access to social, economic, and political development works in South Asia has brought about some changes in their life enhancing their social status. In general, women’s conditions have improved with education and socio-economic development that favors equality and individual rights. But still one thing is common in all regions of South Asia that the vast majority of women are considered subordinated to their male counterpart and most of them survive marginally either at home or outside. This panel will explore the factors that help to change the status of women in South Asia during the last few decades. This panel will also address the impediments and challenges that constrain women from their legitimate clams to enjoy the benefits from development works of the state. Finally the panel will discuss to what extent women in South Asia are prepared to face the challenges to improve their life in the society. While bringing up the issue of the status of the South Asian women, this panel puts special focus on the perspectives of Bangladesh, India and Pakistan.