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Exti05


Reproduction, kinship and generation in the face of climate crisis 
Convenors:
Katharine Dow (University of Cambridge)
Heather McMullen (Queen Mary University of London)
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Stream:
Extinction
Sessions:
Monday 29 March, 14:15-15:45 (UTC+1)

Short Abstract:

This panel focuses on decisions, experiences and public discourse around reproduction and kinship in the face of climate change, while many argue we are facing the prospect of human extinction and publicly deliberating the possibilities for conceiving and caring for children in an ecological crisis.

Long Abstract

Intersections between reproduction and the environment are multiple, timely and vital to the present condition and future potential of human life, with many contemporary activists emphasising the prospect that catastrophic climate change will bring about human extinction. Scholars and activists have shown the effects that environmental conditions can have on reproductive and neonatal health and how these effects are indexical of broader structures of inequality in which certain people's lives and reproductive capacities are valued and encouraged more than others (Hoover 2018; Sturgeon 2010; Lappé, Hein and Landecker 2019; Smietana, Thompson and Twine 2018). This panel invites papers that focus on decision-making, experiences and public discourse around reproduction, kinship and generation in the face of climate change, guided by the following questions: What are the conditions of possibility for conceiving, raising and caring for children in a time of global climate crisis? What kinds of reproductive infrastructures are (re)produced by climate change? How is environmental concern articulated by different people in different contexts and how do these concerns relate to (social) reproduction and kinship? What opportunities does climate change present for social transformation, especially in relation to deconstructing the nuclear family, reconceptualising kinship and queering reproduction?

Accepted papers: