S15
Liminal landscapes: archaeology, in between, here and there, inside and out and on the edge

Convenors:
John B Winterburn (Bristol University)
Location:
Wills 3.32
Start time:
18 December, 2010 at 14:00
Session slots:
1

Short abstract:

The session will aim to use, amongst others, the concepts of spatial, temporal, cultural and mythological liminality as a lens through which to examine a wide range of archaeological landscapes.

Long abstract:

Within this session we would like to explore the concept of liminality and liminal landscapes within an archaeological context. The term landscapes can be used to encompass the micro landscapes of the trench through to macro, large scale, archaeological landscapes. For Arnold van Gennep, there were three stages within a rite of passage, separation, the liminal stage and re-aggregation or reintegration and this concept of liminality forms a useful starting point to examine the role and engagement of archaeologists within these landscapes as well as the participants in their creation. The session will aim to use, amongst others, the concepts of spatial, temporal, cultural and mythological liminality as a lens through which to examine a wide range of landscapes. We plan to attract speakers with a diverse range of research interests from the Neolithic and earlier periods through to Contemporary and Historical archaeology. Examples could include but are not limited to, Neolithic monuments, prehistoric funerary landscapes, Roman frontiers, medieval towns and leper colonies, first settlers and early colonials, conflict landscapes, peace and protest camps, dividing walls and frontiers, urban landscapes and cardboard cities and industrial ruins.