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Poli06


Dependence and livelihood in times of uncertainty 
Convenors:
Judit Durst (Institute for Minority Studies, Hungary)
Gergely Pulay (Centre for Social Sciences, Budapest)
Stefania Toma (Romanian Institute for Research on National Minorities)
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Format:
Panel
Stream:
Politics and Power
Location:
D41
Sessions:
Thursday 8 June, -, -
Time zone: Europe/Prague

Short Abstract:

Through the concept of Dependence and Livelihood this panel aims to contribute to the rethinking of dependent relations in the sphere of economic life in an era of prolonged uncertainty. It explores how these relationships, among others clientelism, are constituted, perceived and negotiated.

Long Abstract:

We are witnessing a proliferation of global crises for more than a decade now. The language of emergency and anxiety define our contemporary existence. In an era of prolonged uncertainty, people resort to dependent relations as a means to securing livelihood. They do so against the backdrop of globally widespread anxieties around the moral effects of 'states of dependence' (Martin - Yanagisako 2020, Piliavsky 2020).

This panel aims to contribute to the rethinking of dependent relations in the sphere of economic life in an era of prolonged uncertainty. Following the bottom-up approach of new economic anthropological thinking (Narotzky 2016) , it invites research papers to investigate how ordinary people make economic decisions, embedded in various regimes of value. The panel asks how dependent relations are constituted between different people with conflicting socio-economic interests? What factors contribute to sustain and reproduce dependencies? What are the consequences of dependent relations to the social reproduction of different communities? And how racial hierarchy and dependent relations are intertwined?

Dependence is an uncomfortable topic to many social scientists as it represents the opposite pole to the pursuit of freedom and self-determination. At the same time, many of the communities we study are organized hierarchically. In fact, hierarchical social organization can even be desirable if it fosters the creation of the pursuit of good life (Piliavsky 2020). In this line of thinking, the panel aims to explore how these dependent relationships, among others, clientelism, are perceived, negotiated, or contested.

Accepted papers:

Session 1 Thursday 8 June, 2023, -
Session 2 Thursday 8 June, 2023, -