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Env05a


Contesting locality: negotiating rules and breaking imaginaries in mountain areas 
Convenors:
Andrea Boscoboinik (University of Fribourg)
Viviane Cretton Mballow (University of Applied Sciences and Arts, Western Switzerland)
Maria Offenhenden (Rovira i Virgili University)
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Stream:
Environment
Format:
Panel
Sessions:
Thursday 24 June, 10:00-11:45 (UTC+3)

Short Abstract:

Mountain regions are undergoing rapid changes which modify its production models, land-use, population and lifestyles. This panel aims to reflect upon mountain areas as contested spaces that entail negotiations and transgressions shaping alternative understandings of locality in a globalised world.

Long Abstract

Mountain regions are undergoing rapid changes closely intertwined with economic globalisation and neoliberal practices, which modify in unexpected ways its production models, land-use, population and lifestyles. Moreover, various forms of mobility are recomposing the social fabric of mountain areas, reshaping the terms of solidarity, participation and conflict, forging new forms and feelings of belonging and otherness, structured on the basis of intersectional categories of social stratification.

Considering locality as a matter of relationships and context, (re)produced by and within social interaction, this panel aims to reflect upon mountain areas as contested spaces that entail complex negotiations between local and global imaginaries and practices. It invites to take an original and reflexive look at classic areas of mountain anthropology by focusing on power relations and tensions between various actors and institutions involved in the production of locality in a globalised world.

To move in this direction, we welcome contributions that explore how rules, imaginaries and values of locality are negotiated, contested or reshaped, at different levels (political, economic, cultural, social); how actors negotiate their identities and feelings as being natives, as well as being international, mobile, worldwide connected and concerned by both local and global causes; how different mountain dwellers (such as international, national, local or multilocal residents, fixed or temporary inhabitants, tourists or workers) relate, practice and produce locality in everyday life; and in turn, in which ways negotiations and transgressions of rules shape alternative understandings of locality.

Accepted papers: