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Heal01a


Care as act of transgression I 
Convenors:
Letizia Bonanno (University of Kent)
Ahmad Moradi (Freie Universität Berlin)
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Discussant:
Tatjana Thelen (University of Vienna IAS Paris)
Stream:
Health and Medicine
Format:
Panel
Start time:
19 June, 2021 at 12:45 (UTC+3)
Session slots:
1

Short Abstract:

The panel explores how rules and their transgressions shape relations of care.Given the substantial opacity of care as an array of practices, expectations and moral imageries, we draw attention to the ways in which relations of care are entangled with forms of violence and acts of transgression.

Long Abstract

This panel explores how rules and their transgressions shape relations of care.Given the opacity of care as an array of practices, expectations and moral imageries, we want to draw attention to the ways in which relations of care are entangled with forms of violence and acts of transgression.Anthropological scholarship describes care either as a moral good or services which can be paid for, as well as practices that create intimate relationships and uncanny forms of dependency.Care seems to also imply rules which dictate how, when and where care can be sought for, provided and enacted, granted and denied.Relationships created through care follow interpersonal and institutional rules whose transgression can influence collective and individual experiences of care, fraught with varying degrees of violence.However not all transgressions of rules are violating; they may even be generative of care relations. As humanitarian studies point out, provisioning care to undocumented migrants often entails the transgression of state regulations.Similarly many self-organised medical initiatives which have spread across Europe delve in an ambiguous domain where the boundaries between formality and informality, legality and illegality dramatically blur. In other contexts, transgressing rigid bureaucratic rules is seen as gestures of care by disabled war veterans.

We thus want to explore the role everyday transgressions of rules plays in arrangements of care relations.Can an act of care entail transgression or being in itself an act of transgression?How could transgression of rules become generative of care relations?How does ethnographic research offer challenging insights on care and violence as intertwined phenomena?

Accepted papers: