Life03
Practising time - temporalities of everyday life

Convenors:
Tine Damsholt (Copenhagen University)
Owe Ronström (Ethnology)
Stream:
Everyday Life
Location:
Aula 26
Start time:
15 April, 2019 at 9:00
Session slots:
2

Short abstract:

Time is practised - in timing events and track changes in life, in juggling competing activities in everyday life (e.g. work-life balance). How are multiple yet simultaneous temporalities negotiated and practised in everyday life: Offline vs. online, children-time vs. 'adult' clock time etc.?

Long abstract:

Time is practised - in timing various events and (track) changes in life, and in juggling competing activities in everyday life (e.g. work-life balance). Time comes in, and is practised in many forms: Personal time, family time and historical time (Hareven 1977), chronological, linear time and experienced, cyclic time (Frykman & Löfgren 1979), or in sacred and secular time. Within historiography multiple temporalities have been identified (e.g. Koselleck 1979, Eriksen 2007) that can be employed simultaneously (Jordheim 2012). Heterotopias, such as museums and gardens, involve a plurality of temporalities; heterochronias (Foucault 1984). This session is an invitation to deploy a multiple and complex understanding of temporality in the study of everyday practices. How are multiple yet simultaneous temporalities practiced and negotiated, such as offline and online time, or 'children's time' clashing with 'adult time' or experienced time with clock time (cf. Thompson 1967)? Specific temporalities may be materialized when visiting the summer cottage or going to remote places 'out-of-time' (cf. Fabian 1983). Also, family time and 'me-time' may be entangled with certain rooms e.g. living room, bathroom or a room of one's own. Mundane track changes such as taking a break may be investigated as the practice of multiple temporalities involving plural routines and tacit bodily knowledge; just as getting the first child, moving in together or life crisis may result in new routines and temporal choreographies (cf. Ehn and Löfgren 2010). We invite papers on the multiple practising of time in everyday life.