Mig02
From welcome culture to the politics of refusal. Mobilization and political transformation after the 2015 migratory movements

Convenors:
Alexandra Schwell (University of Klagenfurt)
Ove Sutter (University of Bonn)
Marie Sandberg (University of Copenhagen)
Stream:
Migration and Borders
Location:
Aula 12
Start time:
15 April, 2019 at 11:15
Session slots:
2

Short abstract:

Following the 2015 migratory movements, the European political landscapes have changed considerably. Institutionalized forms of political negotiation and decision-making appear to be contested by new and conflicting forms of civic mobilization, from Welcome Culture to right-wing populism.

Long abstract:

In the aftermath of the migratory movements in 2015, various civic mobilizations have considerably changed European political landscapes. A plethora of responses by European citizens has mushroomed, either organized in cooperation with refugee organisations and NGOs or in the shape of informal initiatives. Within media and political discourse, such initiatives were labelled the new "Welcome Culture". At the same time, refugees and migrants are met with moral panics, violence, and discrimination throughout Europe. Right-wing populism is on the rise, strengthening anti-immigrant sentiments and stereotypes. Institutionalized forms of political negotiation and decision-making appear to be contested by new and conflicting forms of civic mobilization. We invite contributions that address, but are not limited to, the following topics: How can ethnology and cultural anthropology contribute to an understanding of contentious dynamics of political mobilisation following the migratory movements of 2015? How do we as researchers navigate in a field of mobilizations that is characterized by great disparities? Which topoi do we, or can we explore, and which tropes can help in building new insights? Do we need new concepts and terminologies to understand these different mobilizations? To what extent can a transnational look beyond Europe help understand the contentious cultural and political dynamics of "Welcome Culture" and right-wing populism? In what way are the usual divisions between researchers and interlocutors, refugees and volunteers, guests and hosts, academic and humanitarian interventions, subject to change in the light of contentious civic mobilizations?