Mig04
"Let's talk about culture again!" Re-imagining culture in the processes of mobility and settling down

Convenors:
Judith Albrecht (Freie Universität Berlin)
Lisette Winkler (EHESS)
Stream:
Migration and Borders
Location:
Aula 11
Start time:
17 April, 2019 at 9:00
Session slots:
2

Short abstract:

The trope "culture" has escaped from anthropology to the public realm. We are looking for papers, which critically reflect, how the term culture is used and mobilized in practices outside of academia? How can anthropological discourses re-connect critically with the public discourse of culture?

Long abstract:

The trope "culture" has escaped from anthropology to the public realm. While anthropologists have shifted from the central concept of culture toward more sophisticated and differentiated concepts (e.g. transcultural and transnational studies, where concepts of identities are based on ideas of exchange, contact and negotiation) culture has become a strong popular labelling (in politics, media, education) to distinguish cultural identity and difference. Culturalising and Stereotyping the other (whoever that other is in a certain context) has taken a sinister turn in the current political climate in Europe and North America and is currently pushed forward through the ideology of right-wing populism. Whom do we consider as part of the collective "we"? Whom do we consider "the other"? What do human beings share inside, across, and beyond cultures? These are still existential questions emerging from the present with serious consequences for the future. We are looking for papers on mobility and the process of settling down, which critically reflect on the question, how are the English term culture and its variants in European languages mobilized in practices outside of academia?How can anthropological discourses re-connect critically with the public discourse of culture?We are looking for ethnographic insights from Europe and North America, as well as from places and regions where the notions of "culture" have similarly escaped from the anthropological (or any other) discourse to the public arena, albeit with different terms, language communities, genealogies, practices, and politics.