Mig10
Translocal living and dwelling: homes in the making

Convenors:
Pihla Maria Siim (University of Tartu)
Laura Assmuth (University of Eastern Finland)
Stream:
Migration
Location:
ZHG 002
Start time:
27 March, 2017 at 10:45
Session slots:
2

Short abstract:

In the context of increased mobility, more and more people have multiple or moving homes. Despite the connotation of the word "home" to images of non-motion and permanency, this panel takes mobility as a starting point for cultural analysis of home and translocal practices of homemaking.

Long abstract:

In the context of increased mobility, more and more people have multiple homes or homes in new places. Despite the connotation of the word "home" to images of non-motion and permanency, mobility can be seen as a fruitful starting point of a cultural analysis of translocal homemaking, which is the focus of this panel. Living translocally often means that people develop multiple sites of rootedness and belonging, in which aspects of both discontinuity and fixity can be present. People move between different places of residence and reference systems, which makes it relevant to analyze also the social and political aspects of being-in-place. Processes of homemaking are unavoidably different depending on the status of a person on the move and thus linked to questions of power and inequality. We welcome papers from diverse empirical bases exploring (gendered) everyday practices of translocal living and homemaking: the different ways of being-at-home in a place or on the move. Themes to be addressed include also home as a lived experience; the bodily meanings and practices of translocal dwelling; the role of the imaginary and memory in homemaking; families and/or dwellings as sites of belonging; negotiations between mobile and immobile people; and the ways to turn new places and dwellings into a home with furnishing and decorating, and the role of material objects in this process. Presentations based on ethnographic fieldwork are encouraged, but also papers exploring the theoretical, conceptual or methodological implications of homes-in-the-making are warmly welcome.