Reli01
Building personal religiosity as ways of dwelling religion. From spiritual seekers to faithful believers. (SIEF Ethnology of Religion Working Group Panel)

Convenors:
István Povedák (Hungarian Academy of Sciences / University of Szeged)
Leonard Norman Primiano (Cabrini University)
Marion Bowman (The Open University)
Stream:
Religion
Location:
KWZ 1.601
Start time:
27 March, 2017 at 8:30
Session slots:
2

Short abstract:

This panel aims to bring a better understanding of how believers and spiritual seekers or 'in-betweeners' create the feeling of home and safety through religious traditions.

Long abstract:

During the past decades the research of 'lived' or 'vernacular religiosity' has gained growing interest. By focusing on the axiomatic fact that every person is the creative craftsman of his/her individual beliefs researchers mostly investigated how believers constructed their private religiosity, while less attention has been paid to those who are in between institutionalized believers and agnostics. Similarly to 'vernacular religiosity' of believers, these 'in-betweeners' often amalgamate divergent religious/spiritual traditions and mundane concepts. This panel aims to bring a better understanding of how believers and spiritual seekers or 'in-betweeners' create the feeling of home and safety through religious traditions. We are interested in proposals that investigate the way individuals and communities of individuals use religious traditions as enclosures for the expression of art, anxiety, fear, experience, etc. in the twenty-first century. We look at how originally non-religious idea can replace the traditional, institutional religion in private life and (re)structure everyday life and homes (both physically and non-physically) for believers and 'in-betweeners'? How (non-)religious people 'find home' in religion/spirituality and how does it happen during economic/cultural crisis? Instead of focusing on religious ideas and concepts this panel is committed to the analysis of the way religiosity is being constructed through art, objects and behaviors. These and other questions relating to how the 'feeling of home' is created through religious/spiritual art/objects/symbols even by non-believers are welcomed to be discussed during this panel. Papers which combine ethnographic case studies with theoretical approaches are especially encouraged.