Mig06
Jungles, squats, camps and houses: ethnographic accounts of refugee dwelling practices in the context of the recent "refugee crisis" in Europe and the Middle East

Convenors:
Sabine Hess (Institute for Cultural Anthropology/European Ethnology)
Hatice Pinar Senoguz Ovayolu (University of Göttingen)
Stream:
Migration
Format:
Workshops
Location:
KWZ 0.609
Start time:
27 March, 2017 at 16:00
Session slots:
1

Short abstract:

The panel invites papers that bring forward ethnographic accounts of the vast variety of dwelling practices by refugees and of the attempts of state and private actors to build up spaces of containment all over Europe and the Middle East.

Long abstract:

The mass movements of refugees in recent years have brought back the question of flight and migration with great urgency on the public and academic agenda. Following Michel Agiers approach to study these (new) places of encampment and shelter not only as places of humanitarian government but also as sites of agency and protest, the panel invites papers that bring forward ethnographic accounts of the vast variety of dwelling practices by refugees and the attempts of state and private actors to build up spaces of containment. "Idomeini", self-constructed tent camp at the border between Greece and Macedonia got an iconographic metaphor for the precariousness and creativity at the same time of the refugees on the move along the (new) routes through Europe. Various types of more or less temporary shelter-constructions in urban as well rural settings can be observed alongside the proliferation of camps and more or less prison like facilities by state and private actors bringing back Giorgio Agamben's thesis of "naked live" in spreading "spaces of exceptions". But, as many critics showed this thesis is too one-dimensional as it misses to take into consideration in what ways the refugees and local communities, creatively appropriate the urban/rural landscapes to make a living. We especially encourage papers that pay attention to this aspect and shed light on the creative, subversive practices by the refugee and locals. We also welcome work that look at the role of the expanding field of humanitarian actors in both types of places.