P37
Changing bodies, shifting relationships, and 'the good life': exploring everyday negotiations of chronicity

Convenors:
Narelle Warren (Monash University)
Heather Howard (Michigan State University)
Paul Mason (Monash University)
Location:
Ligertwood 113
Start time:
15 December, 2017 at 11:00
Session slots:
2

Short abstract:

Transformations within and between bodies, and their physical and affective environments, continually shape the possibilities of a 'good life'. This panel explores how chronicity is embedded in everyday encounters, enacted through interpersonal relationships, and empowered through technologies.

Long abstract:

Disabling and chronic conditions, whether lifelong or acquired, prompt transformations within individuals and between people. While a 'good life' is often sought, what constitutes this, how it can be achieved, and for whom it applies varies across cultural settings and state systems. Bodily conditions are central to these 'moral laboratories' of the everyday experiences of people living with chronic conditions, and plays out iteratively: while embodied effects of chronicity necessitate shifts in the relationships between or within bodies, so too may transformations in such relations compel a reconsideration of chronicity itself. In this panel, we attend to the complex disciplinary and agentive relations - between people, with and between bodies, and shaped by broader contexts - in creating an inhabitable world in which a 'good life' can be made possible. Papers will focus on the relational, affective and contextual transformations of interpersonal encounters as a result of chronic illness or disability. Practices of care may be important here, particularly insofar as their negotiation or improvisation reveals intersubjective understandings of what a good life may be. Transformations within and between bodies, and their physical and affective environments, highlight the repertoire of variable components continually shaping the possibilities of a 'good life'. Taking disability and chronic conditions as our focus, this panel invites papers to critically examine how chronicity is embedded in everyday encounters, enacted through interpersonal relationships, and empowered through the use of available technologies.