P13
Engaged anthropology as the intersection between theory and practice

Convenors:
Tamsin Bradley (University of Portsmouth)
Format:
Panels
Location:
Anthropology Library
Start time:
10 June, 2012 at 9:30
Session slots:
2

Short abstract:

The panel will consist of papers from anthropologists who are professionally engaged in international development including tourism and cultural heritage, sustainable livelihoods, human rights and community-led initiatives.

Long abstract:

Increasingly anthropology is being recognised by NGOS and government bodies such as DFID as a valuable means of gathering local knowledge. There is now broad recognition within international development that detailed understanding of the local context is an important starting point for projects intended to impact at a local level. However the relationship between anthropology and the dominant economic models of development remains fraught. Anthropologists stress the need for longitudinal commitment to communities and considerable investment in understanding local dynamics and traditions. This gradual approach often conflicts with the results driven short-term view of NGOs and other actors. As such anthropologists working in development face challenges in trying to assert the practical value of their discipline. The panel will consist of papers from anthropologists who are professionally engaged in international development including tourism and cultural heritage, sustainable livelihoods, human rights and community-led initiatives. We welcome papers from anthropologists actively engaged in areas of international development either as a researcher, practitioners or both.