Accepted paper:

Indigenous People, Livelihood and Culture: The Path that leads to Nayaka's Survival A study on the Nayaka Community

Author:

Saraswathi Gopalkrishna (Azim Premji Foundation)

Paper short abstract:

This Paper is on the Head Loading Community, the Nayaka of H.D. Kote taluk who are totally dependent on the fuel wood collection and selling them to the local public, hotels, bakery etc, for their survival.

Paper long abstract:

Tribal in India present a significant degree of cultural and ethnic diversity. The tribes, who have been mainly confined to hills and forests, have now sought their absorption into the regional and national mainstream. In many ways, Globalization destroys identities. Before the era of Globalization, there existed local, autonomous, distinct and well-defined, culturally sustaining connections between geographical place and cultural experience. This Paper is on the Head Loading Community, the Nayaka of H.D. Kote taluk who are totally dependent on the fuel wood collection and selling them to the local public, hotels, bakery etc, for their survival. It also reflects their socio-economic condition, why head loading, what are the other alternate livelihood sources opted to stop head loading, why female head load more than male, how it is hereditary in nature, how many days in a month do they head load, the communities involved in this livelihood activities, why they are involved, what are the remedial measures that would perhaps make them to stop this activity respectively. Globalization can be observed in different economic, social, cultural, political, finance, and technological dimensions of the world. It is crucial that indigenous peoples' demands are realized; life ways, traditional knowledge and practices are protected and sustained. The impact of globalization is strongest on these populations perhaps more than any other because these communities have no voice and are therefore easily swept aside by the invisible hand of the market and its proponents.

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