PE20
Globalization, emerging markets and social changes in the BRIC countries (IUAES Commission on Enterprise Anthropology)

Convenors:
Gustavo Lins Ribeiro (University of Brasilia)
Jijiao Zhang (Insititute of Ethnology and Anthropology, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences)
Chair:
Gustavo Lins Ribeiro and Zhang Jijiao
Discussant:
Gustavo Lins Ribeiro
Location:
Roscoe Theatre B
Start time:
8 August, 2013 at 11:00
Session slots:
3

Short abstract:

BRICS scholars, especially in the social sciences, have to make efforts to establish closer relations. We will debate the insertion of the BRICS in new global flows of people, information, capital and goods, and consider the ensuing social changes.

Long abstract:

Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa make up the new and much praised global entity named BRICS. While government officials and businessmen of these countries have intensified contacts and exchanges in order to build their own geopolitical conceptions and alliances, in the academic milieu, especially in the social sciences, we still have to make efforts to establish closer relations and to share visions. This panel is a step in that direction. A good starting point would be to debate the intense changes caused by globalization processes in these five countries, also called "emerging markets" . Embedded in different locations within the world system, each one of these countries represent different histories, ethnic segmentations and possibilities of intervening in global processes. Scholars will debate the insertion of the BRICS in new global flows of people, information, capital and goods, as well as consider the ensuing social changes. Which are the new exchanges and scenarios that are shaping different social, economic, cultural and political realities within the BRICS? Which would be their role in a new and differently organized world system? What are the opportunities and problems created by the strengthening of the BRICS to different kinds of citizens in these countries? How can the social sciences, especially anthropology, contribute to these processes? Participants will consider these and other issues in what we expect to be a stimulating exchange of ideas and the beginning of a conversation that will allow for comparative studies to unfold in the future.