LD07
Landscapes of life-and-death in India, South Arabia and Asia Minor

Convenors:
Mikhail Rodionov (Peter-the-Great Museum of Anthropology and Ethnography, St. Petersburg)
Discussant:
Mikhail Rodionov
Location:
Alan Turing Building G107
Start time:
9 August, 2013 at 14:30
Session slots:
2

Short abstract:

An interregional approach, incorporating interdisciplinary data, is employed to gain a deeper insight on the fundamental characteristics of cultural landscape as a multi-dimensional configuration of cultural space. The panel aims to draw a broader picture of Life-and-Death in its indissoluble unity

Long abstract:

An interdisciplinary and interregional approach, incorporating archaeological, historical, ethnographic and literary data, is employed to gain a deeper insight on the fundamental characteristics, namely life and death, of cultural landscape as a multi-dimensional configuration of cultural space. The panel aims to map the spatial features of a given traditional culture and to draw a broader picture of intercultural relations concerned with Life-and-Death in its indissoluble unity. This task is pursued by a team of cultural anthropologists from the Peter-the-Great Museum of Anthropology and Ethnography, St. Petersburg, Russia, within the project "The Space of Cultural Spaces in Asia". At least two books provided ample resource for this research have to be mentioned - Lynne Newton "A Landscape of Pilgrimage and Trade in Wadi Masila, Yemen" (BAR, 2009) and a collective work edited by Lloyd Weeks "Death and Burial in Arabia and Beyond" (BAR, 2010). In his presentation Yaroslav Vasil'kov treats the commemorative culture of the Bronze Age, at the vast area between Northern Mediterranean, Altai Mountains, Yemen, and Indian peninsula, as a spatially localized phenomenon. Commemorative traditions of the Hadramaut as a Life-and-Death cultural landscape are examined by Mikhail Rodionov. Veronika Ivanova deals with the crossroads in cultural space of Anatolian Turks as symbolical intersection of life and death. Igor Kotin addresses reterritorialized cultural space of Indian diaspora. Ol'ga Merenkova highlights the changing pattern of Life-and-Death among the British Bengali based on a literary source displaying extra-textual roots of a textual strategy. The panel is open to scholars with the regional focus.