LD06
Anthropologies in and of public health in the 21st century

Convenors:
Margret Jaeger (SFU Private University )
Helen Lambert (University of Bristol)
Waleska Aureliano (Museu Nacional/ Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro)
Location:
Roscoe 1.009
Start time:
6 August, 2013 at 14:00
Session slots:
3

Short abstract:

This panel examines the relevance of anthropology to health processes and policy. It aims to explore anthropological engagement in one of the fundamental concerns of humanity, that of health and wellbeing, with a perspective that goes beyond the individual clinical subject as defined by biomedicine.

Long abstract:

This panel examines the relevance of anthropology to local and global health processes and policy. It aims to explore anthropological engagement in one of the fundamental concerns of humanity, that of health and wellbeing, with a perspective that goes beyond the individual clinical subject as defined by biomedicine. Through the view that individual wellbeing is related to membership in human groups, anthropology has contributed to variety of public health issues and programmes including policy formation, disease prevention, health education, and organization and delivery of health services, as well as local community initiatives addressing situations of ill-being. We invite contributions that critically analyse the formation and implementation of public health programmes and intervention - anthropologies of public health - as well as those that describe anthropological contributions in the design and implementation of public health initiatives - anthropologies in public health. The panel is not confined to a particular geographical area or disease focus. It seeks to investigate what is particular to the anthropological perspective and the possibilities that such a perspective brings to the understanding of public health, local knowledge, effects of social change, and impact of health services and intervention on local communities. Papers that explore tensions and dilemmas between public health and anthropological analyses are particularly welcome. Contributions may be at a 'macro' level, such as examining priorities in global health and their manifestations within a particular national context; or at a 'micro' level, such as ethnographic investigation of a sanitation or immunization programme within a specific setting.