P25
Into and out of Taiwan: alternative perspectives on population movements and influences since the Neolithic

Convenors:
I-lin Wu (Université de Paris X)
Location:
Salle du conseil 4th floor MAE
Start time:
7 July, 2015 at 14:30
Session slots:
2

Short abstract:

This panel aims to explore population movements and influences from and to coastal south China and Taiwan 6000-4000 years ago in order to provide a better understanding of early Austronesian-speaking populations and to see which are the future direction to take.

Long abstract:

The great spread of the Austronesian-speaking peoples in the prehistory of the Pacific Ocean is a prominent phenomenon, and the movement of early Austronesians is a very challenged topic among scholars. Whether the diffuse route from south China-Taiwan to the Philippines until the Pacific, or the disperse maritime network from the Philippines to Korea and Japan, the movement of the early stage to the Austronesian-speaking peoples seems to have some of space for discussion. Traditional models have been quite debated, where we are standing now? Recently, numbers of archaeological sites have been unearthed in Taiwan and the southern coast of China (Fujian, Guangdong, Pearl River Delta, Hong Kong, Tonkin Gulf, Leizhou Peninsula). New data yielded from these sites provide important information for our understanding of the early Austronesian. They are located on ancient coasts, dunes, or island's sandbanks, dated around 6000-4000 years ago. Most of these sites share common cultural characteristics. This panel aims to explore population movements and influences from and to coastal south China and Taiwan 6000-4000 years ago in order to provide a better understanding of early Austronesian-speaking populations and to see which are the future direction to take.