P26
Onstage/offstage? Historicizing performance cultures in text, society, and practice

Convenors:
Richard David Williams (University of Oxford)
Priyanka Basu (School of Oriental and African Studies)
Location:
25H38
Start time:
24 July, 2014 at 9:00
Session slots:
2

Short abstract:

This panel will examine the performing arts by foregrounding the historical and social contexts of performers' relationships to their audiences. The common or connected histories of these performers presents an alternative to drawing distinctions between 'elite' and 'popular' entertainments.

Long abstract:

This panel will examine the performing arts by foregrounding the historical and social contexts of performers' relationships to their audiences. The common or connected histories of these performers presents an alternative to drawing distinctions between 'elite' and 'popular' entertainments. The panellists will draw together archival, ethnographic, and theoretical approaches to performance (including Nachni, Kobigaan and Kathakali) in colonial and post-colonial South Asia, to trace common and divergent points in the histories of the performer, the audience, and the intertextuality of the performative and the social contexts. The papers will: - discuss how 19th century performers 'marketed' themselves for specific audiences, and demarcated themselves from other, related communities; - examine the relationship between text and its communication, contextualizing the social framework within which the performance is historicized and nurtured; - consider the specific gender orientation of a popular performance, focussing on performativity, movement practice and communicative dialogues between the audience and the performer; - historicize the re-contextualization of a performance tradition in the context of a changing performance space and audience reception, changing economies and emerging global markets.