P43


Political parties and change in South Asia 
Convenors:
James Chiriyankandath (University of London)
Andrew Wyatt (University of Bristol)
Location:
C402
Start time:
28 July, 2012 at 9:00 (UTC+0)
Session slots:
2

Short Abstract:

Political parties have been a significant feature of the political landscape in South Asia. Today every state has a multiparty political system with parties forming the government. The aim of the panel is to broaden and deepen comparative understanding of the role of parties in national life.

Long Abstract

Political parties, often rooted in movements for independence, have been a significant feature of the political landscape in the subcontinent for well over a century. Today every state has a multiparty political system with parties forming the government as well as operating on the margins and beyond constitutional electoral politics. They range from Marxist to religiously-oriented, and ethnic and caste-based parties. Yet apart from for a time in the 1960s and 1970s they have not received much scholarly attention. The broad focus of this panel will be how parties across South Asia have been shaped by - and responded and contributed to - political, social, cultural and economic changes. The aim will be to broaden and deepen comparative understanding of the role of parties in national life. In order to do so contributors may use approaches drawn from a range of disciplines - political science, history, sociology, anthropology and cultural studies.

Accepted papers: