P23


Yogis, sufis, devotees: religious/literary encounters in pre-modern and modern South Asia 
Convenors:
Heidi Pauwels (University of Washington)
Mauro Valdinoci (University of Modena and Reggio Emilia)
Veronique Bouillier (CNRS France)
James Mallinson (Institute of Classical Studies, Lavasa)
Mikko Viitamäki (University of Helsinki - Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes (EPHE))
Location:
C402
Start time:
27 July, 2012 at 9:00 (UTC+0)
Session slots:
3

Short Abstract:

This panel investigates the confluence of ideas in modern and pre-modern South Asia, focusing on reports/imaginations of encounters between holy men of all stripes, highlighting the dynamics of exchange/competition between them and the processes involved in identity construction/affirmation.

Long Abstract

This panel seeks to investigate the confluence of ideas in modern and pre-modern South Asia, by highlighting reports/depictions/imaginations of encounters between holy men of all stripes, whether Sufi, Yogi, Bhakta, Sikh, Buddhist, Siddha... We want to focus on the dynamics of exchange/competition between them and the processes involved in identity construction/affirmation. We welcome contributions from all disciplines, whether religious studies, comparative literature, history, or art...

As for the core-contributors: Véronique Bouillier (EHESS, Paris) will present on Nāths and Sufis encounters, Jim Mallinson (Oxford University, UK) will discuss how from the 16th century onwards sectarian affiliation became important and within a relatively amorphous group of ascetics various orders coalesced, adopting organisational structures, and philosophical and doctrinal principles, Heidi Pauwels (U. of Washington, Seattle) will present on soirées of Bhaktas and Sufis in the early eighteenth century, Mauro Valdinoci (University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Italy) will look at the views of a contemporary Hyderabadi Sufi master concerning the dealings between various religious traditions, and Mikko Viitamåki (Univ. Helsinki - Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes, Paris) will discuss the controversial Nizami Bansuri "translated" by Khvaja Hasan Nizami in the late 1940s.

Accepted papers: