P33


Law and religion in practice in South Asia 
Convenors:
Justin Jones (University of Exeter )
Nandini Chatterjee (University of Exeter)
Location:
C301
Start time:
26 July, 2012 at 16:15 (UTC+0)
Session slots:
1

Short Abstract:

Discussing how forms of legal adjudication and religious identities were profoundly transformed by their mutual encounter, this panel interrogates the interactions of law, whether defined in terms of state legal principles or normative legal practice, and the management and experience of 'religion'.

Long Abstract

This panel seeks to interrogate the interactions of law, whether defined in terms of state legal principles or normative legal practice, and the management and experience of 'religion' in South Asia. Building on a wide body of literature which has examined how forms of legal adjudication and religious identities were profoundly transformed by their mutual encounter, this panel invites discussions of such subjects as the administration of religious personal laws, state management of religious institutions, court interventions into 'religious' questions, or the centrality of legal autonomy in the making of religious community identities. This panel aims to bring together papers on colonial India and postcolonial South Asia in comparative perspective, as well as linking studies of South Asia's multiple religious communities and their various interactions with law.

Accepted papers: