P44


Security architecture in South Asia: prospects and challenges 
Convenor:
Christian Wagner (German Institute for International and Security Affairs)
Location:
C407
Start time:
26 July, 2012 at 9:00 (UTC+0)
Session slots:
3

Short Abstract:

South Asia is still characterized by a variety of security challenges from territorial disputes, religious terrorisms to left wing extremism and the threat of nuclear warfare. The panel will focus on on bilateral relations in South Asia and the policies of China and the United States in the region.

Long Abstract

South Asia is still characterized by a variety of security challenges ranging from territorial disputes, religious terrorisms to left wing extremism and the threat of nuclear warfare. On the one hand, regional security is still fragile especially with regard to relations between India and Pakistan. The Mumbai attack of 2008 has shown the fragility of their bilateral rapprochement. On the other hand, India has intensified bilateral security cooperation in the region with various neighboring countries like Bangladesh, Nepal, Bhutan and Sri Lanka. But South Asia's security architecture is also shaped by countries like China and the United States. China has increased its political, economic, and military engagement in the region in recent years. The United States have a long history of economic and military relations with individual South Asian countries.

These developments raise the question in how far they have helped to improve the security situation both on the regional and in individual countries. In order to evaluate the prospects and challenges of a regional security architecture the panel will welcome presentations on bilateral relations and comparative foreign policy analysis of South Asian countries as well as contributions dealing with the policies of China and the United States in the region.

Accepted papers: