P152
Geographies of violence and the migration of conflict

Convenors:
Franziska Rueedi (University of the Witwatersrand)
Chair:
Dr Franziska Rueedi
Stream:
Panels
Location:
KH111
Start time:
29 June, 2017 at 14:00
Session slots:
1

Short abstract:

This panel looks at geographies of violence and the migration of conflict between and among urban and rural areas. It pays attention to the movement of violent subjectivities and the role of rumour in shaping the production of prejudice, fear and hostility that undergird processes of othering.

Long abstract:

This panel looks at geographies of violence and the migration of conflict between and among urban and rural areas. Collective violence has shaped uprisings, conflicts between religious, ethnic or political groups and other forms of political and social action across the continent. Although violence is always symptomatic of conflict, conflict is not always accompanied by violence. Violence is underwritten by political subjectivity and agency that is distinct and requires scholarly attention. At times discrete, violence can be a 'dynamic process' that connects different incidents across time and space. Networks of migration and information, in particular, facilitate the circulation of perceptions of danger and hostility and the movement of violent subjectivities that transcend spatial and temporal boundaries. In this context, rumour plays a significant role in producing these geographies of violence. As case studies from France, Kenya and India demonstrate, moments of collective action are often accompanied by rumour of impending violence and perceived threats, therefore shaping the production of prejudice, fear and hostility that undergird processes of othering. This panel invites papers examining patterns of violence in conflict areas. How and why do conflict and violence travel across regions? What role does rumour play in fomenting violent conflict? What is the affective dimension of violence? How are perceptions and understandings of danger constructed across space and time? And what role does historical memory play in sedimenting violence? Paper submissions are invited from all disciplines.