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Anth39


Looking back. Looking ahead: dynamics of accumulation and development in post-colonial Africa 
Convenors:
George Mudimu (MUAST)
Tom Tom (University of South Africa)
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Chair:
Andrew Chilombo (Envirosmart Solutions)
Format :
Panel
Streams :
Anthropology (x) Conservation & Land Governance (y)
Sessions:
Wednesday 31 May, -
Time zone: Europe/Berlin

Short Abstract:

The present intervention zooms in on how accumulation has evolved in African states and how African states have navigated the development terrain and with what ramifications for Africa’s young and growing population.

Long Abstract:

Seven decades have passed since some of the African countries have attained independence. Over the varying decades of independence, African states have gone through several ups and downs. The present intervention zooms in on how accumulation has evolved in African states and how African states have navigated the development terrain and with what ramifications for Africa’s young and growing population. Attention is also paid to how the two competing and mostly incompatible types of accumulation - capital accumulation and social accumulation - have affected African development trajectories. While neo-liberal economic and social policies mostly imposed on Africa are informed by the principles of capital accumulation, most African states are based on the principles of social accumulation hinged on kin and ethnicity The evolution of these forms of accumulation and their relevance in Africa’s development needs have excited contrasting debates on the most conducive models for Africa’s development. Are neo-liberal policies really the panacea for Africa’s development challenges? Or is mainstreaming the key principles of the ‘’economy of affection” a game changer in Africa’s progress? Key issues that draw our attention and on which contributions in this panel are based on focus on;

1. The dynamics of extractivism resultant outcomes on the environment and the peoples.

4. How Africa has been enmeshed in the ‘transition overload’ and the forces undergirding this trajectory.

5. A deepened understanding of how poly crisis (capitalism, wars, diseases and climate change) has evolved, shaping political responses

7. Changing rural livelihoods in Africa. From what to where?

Accepted paper:

Session 1 Wednesday 31 May, 2023, -