Pol21
Decolonization and pedagogy - disruptions and connections in the classroom

Convenors:
Stephanie Diepeveen (University of Cambridge)
Annette LaRocco (Florida Atlantic University )
Stream:
Politics and International Relations
Location:
Appleton Tower, Room M1
Sessions:
Thursday 13 June, 17:55-19:25

Short abstract:

The 2015 Rhodes Must Fall movement opened a new wave of debate surrounding issues of decolonization of the academy, research practices and pedagogy. This panel seeks papers exploring the politics of building socially-just classrooms, and developing and advocating for decolonized teaching practices.

Long abstract:

The 2015 Rhodes Must Fall movement at the University of Cape Town opened a new wave of debate surrounding the issues of decolonization of the academy, research practices, scholarly publication, and pedagogy. This panel takes seriously diverse engagements with the decolonize movements and aims to explore transnational connections and (potentially) disruptive best practices in decolonial teaching. This panel seeks papers exploring the politics of building socially-just classrooms, and developing and advocating for decolonized teaching practices amidst a wide variety of pressures including—but not limited to—the neoliberalization of higher education, increasingly stringent student visa requirements in the Global North (notably connected to isolationist immigration policies in the US and the UK), and the lack of diversity in the facultariat along race, gender, and class lines. Paper submissions can address a wide variety of questions, including: how are different actors navigating the constrained space of academic institutions, career pathways and markers of success in order to decolonize knowledge production, to varying degrees and ways? What space is there for students, faculty and others to initiate change? Are there lessons to be learned from decolonize movements among other marginalized communities and regions? This panel recognizes the complexity and contradictions in attempts to decolonize an institution premised upon the exclusion and devaluing of particular realities and forms of knowledge. This panel aims to provide space to critically consider different entry points for disrupting the implicit and explicit constraints around the classroom, in relation to people, ideas and content.