P109
Global and transnational connections in contemporary African arts and creative practice
Convenors:
Lizelle Bisschoff (University of Glasgow)
Isabel Mendes (Queen Margaret University)
Chair:
Lizelle Bisschoff and Isabel Moura Mendes
Location:
2E07
Start time:
29 June, 2013 at 9:00
Session slots:
2

Short abstract:

This panel will look at the increasingly diasporic, inter- and transnational positioning of African art, artists, and their cultural and creative practices, including filmmaking, music, visual arts, theatre and literature.

Long abstract:

This panel will look at the diasporic, inter- and transnational positioning of African art, artists, and their cultural and creative practices, including filmmaking, music, visual arts, theatre and literature. Through new mobilities and methods - such as digital technologies, the internet and mobile phones - and their applications in African creative practices, artists and cultural practitioners are exploring new genres and production methods and establishing international and cross-continental links in both the production and consumption of creative products. Umbrella organisations and regional, continental and international events and initiatives within the arts and creative practices - such as the Arterial Network, music festivals, film festivals, arts competitions, conferences and think tanks - increasingly bring together a diverse range of African artists, performers, intellectuals and audiences. These initiatives and events are examples of novel and innovative spaces where creative and cultural practice is shaped, discussed and disseminated. In capital cities across the continent postcolonial structures such as the Goethe Institut, the Instituto Camoes or the Institut Francais have established themselves as privileged spaces for practitioners where art not only happens, but is supported. They are recognised and important artistic hubs, at times in contrast with the countries' own cultural policies. Similarly, government funded transnational European institutions play an increasingly important role in supporting their member's countries cultural policies. The panel will not only look at the continental connections of African artistic and creative practices, but also how contemporary African arts and culture is received outside of Africa in an increasingly globalised world.