P097
Waging peace: using military resources for conflict resolution in Africa
Convenor:
Philip Afaha (University of Abuja)
Discussant:
DR NOAH ATTAH
Location:
2E06
Start time:
29 June, 2013 at 9:00
Session slots:
2

Short abstract:

The objective of this panel therefore is to examine the efforts in Africa at using military resources for conflict resolution instead of war. The panel will also address how this strategy among others can be articulated for maintaining peace in Africa.

Long abstract:

WAGING PEACE: USING MILITARY RESOURCES FOR CONFLICT RESOLUTION IN AFRICA By PHILIP AFAHA PhD DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY UNIVERSITY OF ABUJA, NIGERIA +2348035330806 PANEL PROPOSAL The concept of waging peace by mobilizing military resources for conflict resolution is fast gaining ground in Africa, especially at a time the world is increasingly become less prone to interstate aggression. The global community is becoming disposed to peaceful resolution of crisis through the use of military arsenal instead of mobilizing military strength for war that characterized the middle of the 20th century. The situation now is a coordinated military intervention for the restoration of peace in crisis zones or a deliberate beef-up of military resources to prevent escalation of crisis. This has been demonstrated in the interventions of African Union (AU) and ECOMOG in some of the crises that have plagued African continent. The objective of this panel therefore is to examine the efforts in Africa at using military resources for conflict resolution instead of war. The panel will also address how this strategy among others can be articulated for maintaining peace in Africa. The panel intends to advance the analysis of waging peace in Africa from the following perspectives: a. The concept of waging peace in Africa b. Historical discourses around mobilizing military powers for conflict resolution c. Evaluation of this strategy d. The roles of countries and organizations that have adopted this strategy in Africa The panel invites papers that offer rigorous analysis of the identified issues from various critical perspectives. Comparative studies are also welcome.